Projects submitted to the Data Journalism Awards competition

Right here you will find a list of all the projects submitted to the Data Journalism Awards competition.  

«Death Excavations» an investigation about "Monuments under the mines"
Country: Egypt
Organisation: tahrirnews
Investigation of the year
SensorBotsImmersiveInteractiveInvestigationCollaborationMapsVideoVisualisationAccessibility / InclusivityVerificationAudioCrimePublic institutions
Applicant
AHMED & Salah eldeen
saeed sayed hassanin & ebrahim ali morsy laban
Team Members
A DOCUMENTRY BYAHMED SAEED HASSANIN & SALAH LABAN.Photography:Mohammed Abu ZaidTranslation VIDEO:Mahmoud ZahranVideo EditingMutaz HassanMohamed SaeedAHMED ZOHIERMotion graphic:Amr AhmedAdel AzabVoice commentary:Mohamed ObaidAudio engineering:Islam MahdiDIRECTED BYAHMED SAEED HASSANIN & SALAH LABAN
Project Description
“Death excavations” An investigation reveals the size of danger that face thousands of workers during their excavation in various Egyptian governorates, whether Egyptian or foreign archaeological missions that work in EgyptThe number of these missions reaches 235 foreign archaeological missions from different nationalities, because of the existence of the Landmines which planted in the second World War and have not been removed yet, despite the Egyptian demands from many countries who were the cause of planting these mines..The investigative journalists received news in their journey in 5 Egyptian governorates: (Ismailia, Sharqia, Marsa Matrouh, Giza, El Gharbeya, in addition to archeological area at El Alamin) during 7 months,indicating that there are 8 dangerous areas caused the death of many innocent people.All these events were met with media blackout, without issuing official approvals to work and excavate without knowing the nature of these areas, or taking precautions for protection and safety, in addition to absence of maps which indicates the dangerous areas or statistics for those who were injured or diedDuring the investigation, we meet families of some victims, who lost their lives because of the mines explosion at the archeological areas, and we discovered a mine explosion at the pyramids area in 2007,2009,2010 that resulting in injury of three people, and we surprised by the blackout of local and foreign media on the details of the incident.And we tried to find answers during the investigation on several questions: who is responsible for the lives of those people who were killed or injured while excavation?, Why did the Standing Committee of the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities agreed to accept requests from archaeological missions to carry out excavations in dangerous areas ?, and why the mine victims do not receive suitable compensation from the ministry?The investigation raised many reactions following its publication,more than 20 deputies in the house of representative have asked for a group discussion about landmine issue.Dr zahi hawas, former minister of antiquites called on the countries of the world to help egypt in demining these areasDr Mohamed El Kahlawy , secretary of the union of arab archeologists , announced a ceremony to honour the families of the victims.
What makes this project innovative?
The most important characteristic of our investigation, Death Excavations, is the strength of the idea, the severity of the effect and the big scale of those people affected by the presence of landmines in dangerous archaeological sites.For the first time, in any local or foreign media, we evoke the idea of having landmines existing in some archaeological sites, causing a lot of casualties, amidst a blackout by the concerned authorities in Egypt and without any compensation, no maps of dangerous archaeological zones, as well as the detection of landmines existing in the archaeological area of the Giza Pyramids.Those landmines threaten the lives of more than 10,000 archaeologists who work in Egypt, as well as the labors working with them in those archaeological sites, in addition to having 235 foreign archaeological missions, involving various nationalities, working in the field of archaeological discovery in Egypt, and the presence of those mines threatens their lives in the event of mine explosions.We have come up with some private official documents from officials from inside the Egyptian Ministry of International Cooperation, revealing the existence of impediments to Egypt to clear mines from contaminated areas. These include the lack of accurate records for minefields, as well as its high sensitivity, since they have been detected for more than 50 years and they might be moved by changing circumstances , as the movement of sand in some areas led to the presence of mines at a depth of more than 2 meters in depth, as well as the discovery of large-caliber and unforeseen aircraft bombs up to 2000 lbs, and the high cost of demining those areas where mines are deployed in Egypt, as it costs up to $250 million, at a rate of $1000 per the hectare (1 ha = 10,000 m2), which is less than the global demining rate estimate set by the Mecam Foundation in 1997, estimated at $335 million at a rate of $1351 per hectare.
What was the impact of your project? How did you measure it?
The investigation and inquiry process has relied on systematic methods, during which we initially relied on the review of the most salient facts of casualties caused by the presence of mines in archaeological sites through the traditional search engines. Then we moved on the ground for 7 months and went to 5 Egyptian governorates in addition to the city of Al-Alameen, administratively separated from the city of Marsa Matrouh, to meet the families of the victims in those six governorates. We met the families of victims and injured in such events whether in the area of the archeological Area of Tal Dafna in Ismailia and the Tal Al-Ayis area in the city of Al Alameen, as we went to the archaeological area of "the Pyramids" to see the cause of the archaeological workers\' deaths in the Pyramids Area as a result of a landmine explosion.Then we went to the executive Secretariat for mine Clearance at the Ministry of International Cooperation to obtain official data and information on the scale and ratio of mines in Egypt, the numbers of victims and problems impeding Egypt in the field of mine clearance and the volume of international aid and grants obtained by Egypt in that field.Also, we went to meet some Egyptologists, experienced in the field of excavation for antiquities, to recognize the nature of archaeological work and the fact that all archaeological missions, whether Egyptian, joint or foreign, are working with maps or not.
Source and methodology
The investigation and inquiry process has relied on systematic methods, during which we initially relied on the review of the most salient facts of casualties caused by the presence of mines in archaeological sites through the traditional search engines. Then we moved on the ground for 7 months and went to 5 Egyptian governorates in addition to the city of Al-Alameen, administratively separated from the city of Marsa Matrouh, to meet the families of the victims in those six governorates. We met the families of victims and injured in such events whether in the area of the archeological Area of Tal Dafna in Ismailia and the Tal Al-Ayis area in the city of Al Alameen, as we went to the archaeological area of "the Pyramids" to see the cause of the archaeological workers\' deaths in the Pyramids Area as a result of a landmine explosion.Then we went to the executive Secretariat for mine Clearance at the Ministry of International Cooperation to obtain official data and information on the scale and ratio of mines in Egypt, the numbers of victims and problems impeding Egypt in the field of mine clearance and the volume of international aid and grants obtained by Egypt in that field.Also, we went to meet some Egyptologists, experienced in the field of excavation for antiquities, to recognize the nature of archaeological work and the fact that all archaeological missions, whether Egyptian, joint or foreign, are working with maps or not.Then we met with members in Parliament to identify their attitude to the risks to which the archaeological workers are exposed, and the reasons for not even having a law for the establishment of an archaeological union. Then we met with the directors of the archaeological zones in five governorates, as well as the headquarters of the United Nations Office in Egypt, the UNESCO office and the UNICEF Office to obtain accurate information about the archaeological areas in Egypt, and we have prepared maps and detailed data on the scales of the landmines in Egypt and their places of deployment.
Technologies Used
Technology and applications that were adopted during the investigationWe have prepared maps of dangerous archaeological sites after our findings during the investigationPreparing a video to document the investigative investigation in Arabic (20 minutes)Preparing a video to document the investigative investigation in English (only 7 minutes)Preparing Motion Graphics maps Prepare tables and graphsTables and statistics on the numbers and proportions of the victims and the injuredA table with official proportions of mine locationsDetailed data on the location of mines in the governorates of EgyptPhotos through a field search trip during the investigationThe investigation and inquiry process has relied on systematic methods, during which we initially relied on the review of the most salient facts of casualties caused by the presence of mines in archaeological sites through the traditional search engines. Then we moved on the ground for 7 months and went to 5 Egyptian governorates in addition to the city of Al-Alameen, administratively separated from the city of Marsa Matrouh, to meet the families of the victims in those six governorates. We met the families of victims and injured in such events whether in the area of the archeological Area of Tal Dafna in Ismailia and the Tal Al-Ayis area in the city of Al Alameen, as we went to the archaeological area of "the Pyramids" to see the cause of the archaeological workers\' deaths in the Pyramids Area as a result of a landmine explosion.Then we went to the executive Secretariat for mine Clearance at the Ministry of International Cooperation to obtain official data and information on the scale and ratio of mines in Egypt, the numbers of victims and problems impeding Egypt in the field of mine clearance and the volume of international aid and grants obtained by Egypt in that field.Also, we went to meet some Egyptologists, experienced in the field of excavation for antiquities, to recognize the nature of archaeological work and the fact that all archaeological missions, whether Egyptian, joint or foreign, are working with maps or not.Then we met with members in Parliament to identify their attitude to the risks to which the archaeological workers are exposed, and the reasons for not even having a law for the establishment of an archaeological union. Then we met with the directors of the archaeological zones in five governorates, as well as the headquarters of the United Nations Office in Egypt, the UNESCO office and the UNICEF Office to obtain accurate information about the archaeological areas in Egypt, and we have prepared maps and detailed data on the scales of the landmines in Egypt and their places of deployment.Later, we met with the official of the Ministry of Antiquities to find out about those facts, the causes of the incidents causing such casualties and the fact that the excavation workers were exploited to work in archaeological areas without detailed maps, revealing the corruption and the government negligence behind this case.